Rescue, Breed, Protect

Loggerhead turtle

At SEA LIFE Scheveningen Aquarium, we have lots of local activities you can support or get involved with!

SEA LIFE Conservation work hard to protect every part of our oceans and sea life that lives within it, whether the threat is man made, due to population changes in the wild, or an effect of global warming, we take action.

Locally we have an upcoming release of one the most critically endangered - and most rarely seen - sea turtles. The kemps ridley sea turtle Flip will be released this year in the United States after she was stranded at the Dutch shore in December 2011. Since she was found on the beach, she has been held in quarantine at SEA LIFE Scheveningen. Here she recovered from her injuries and gained enough strength to be released in her natural environment.
Learn more about Flip

Our Conservation Successes

  • Breeding
  • Seal Rescues
  • Re-homing
  • Campaigns

Seahorse Breeding

Sea horse

SEA LIFE has been a pioneer in the field of seahorse breeding, successfully breeding and rearing nine different species to date to help this very sensitive and endangered sea creature from facing extinction.

Our programme has meant that we do not need to rely on external suppliers to find seahorses for our exhibitions. That means that none will ever be taken from the wild on our behalf. It also means that we may be able to use our stock to resupply wild stock if they become extinct in the wild.

We are members of an international Taxon Advisory Group, which oversees important seahorse protection and conservation endeavours around the world.

Seal Rescues

Seal rescue

SEA LIFE and its sister brand the Seal Sanctuaries annually rescues, cares for and returns to the wild more than 100 orphaned, injured and sick seal pups each year.

Marine Animal Rescue

Marine animal rescue

We also rescue other creatures that need our help, including rare sturgeon, dolphins, Minke Whales and Sea Turtles. In 2009 a rare Kemps Ridley Turtle found close to death on a beach in southern England was returned to the wild off North Carolina.

Re-homing

Re-homing

SEA LIFE provides permanent homes for damaged and disabled creatures rescued and in need of homing, that would otherwise have been killed or put to sleep.

By show casing all of these beautiful creatures that have found their way to live with us, we can engage with our visitors to help you to understand how small daily routines and changes can count towards the survival of many of our creatures at no cost or little effort!

Occasionally we rescue and care for other, more unusual creatures. We gave homes to two severely disabled Loggerhead Sea Turtles. Antiopi, who was brain damaged by an ugly gaffe-wound and Lefteris, who had lost two flippers would have both died if a collaboration between us and the Sea Turtle Protection Society of Greece (Archelon) hadn’t brought them to us.

Campaigns

Campaigns

We are active campaigners and do all we can to raise awareness of the critical issues facing the creatures of the oceans. We have been involved with lots of campaigns: the WDCS 2010 Stop Whaling Campaign, petitions to force the Greek government to improve conservation of sea turtle nesting beaches, helping to outlaw the grisly shark-fining industry, and reducing the impact of by-catch on vulnerable species. And it won’t stop there. We will always be involved.

Our Commitment to Conservation

Here at SEA LIFE we care deeply about our oceans, the creatures that live above and beneath the surface and those we are lucky enough to have in our care. We are experts in husbandry and will only keep creatures that we know will thrive in the displays we create for them.

We are campaigners and activists, doing all we can to preserve the precious life that dwells in our oceans. As well as the practical breeding, homing, rescue and rehabilitation of ocean dwelling creatures we also petition governments, host conferences and help raise awareness of all kinds of important marine issues.

Protection of Turtles

A SEA LIFE fund raising campaign has enabled a new Sea Turtle Rescue and Wildlife Information Centre to be built on the Greek island of Zakynthos. This is because 90% of the loggerhead turtle nests in the Mediterranean are found here. Until the centre was built any adult turtles injured in collisions with pleasure craft or through entanglement in fishing gear around the island (of which there are many) could only be treated at a centre in Athens, a day’s travel away.

Brighton Sea Life Centre is also raising funds to assist turtle conservation work by Project Tamar in Brazil.

Working with other Groups

We are proud to work alongside lots of important environmental groups. These include: Greenpeace, The Marine Conservation Society, The Shark Trust, The Isle of Man Basking Shark Survey, The Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society, The Wildlife Trust, the Worldwide Fund for Nature and others.

We have financed vital field projects and have hosted exhibitions, fund-raising events and press conferences to help wildlife charities draw attention to particular marine conservation issues.

Aiding Research

We have helped fisheries research by supplying mature shoaling species of seahorses for tagging and release.

We also carry out shark tagging through many of our centres. This work helps researchers to understand how habitat changes have affected the sharks lives. Our staff at Blackpool carry out target training to begin to understand how different shark species react to colour and shapes underwater. This valuable research will aid the understanding of movements of sharks on the wild.

Education & Awareness

We attract over six million visitors every year. This gives us a unique opportunity to increase awareness of, and support for, a wide range of marine conservation issues. We do this by placing an emphasis on environmental concerns wherever possible.

We also organise and host high profile conferences and events to attract the attention of the industry, media and general public. These have included an International Shark Conference at the National Sea Life Centre in Birmingham, a ‘Junior’ Shark Conference at Weymouth and a National Junior Sea Life Conference in Birmingham.

These events cover marine issues ranging from the controversial Alaskan seal cull to shark finning, whaling and the erosion of coral reefs.

More about SEA LIFE conservation


Our Local projects

Release Flip

Green sea turtle

Learn more

Turtle Fest

Loggerhead turtle

Learn more

Seahorse breeding and conservation centre

seahorse - back from the brink

Learn more >

Shark week

Nurse shark

Learn more >

Beach clean up

beach clean

Learn more >


Our Global projects

Conservation of turtle nests

Turtle nesting

Discover more

Back from the brink

seahorse conservation

The spiny Seahorse

Stop whaling

New stop whaling

Help us stop whaling


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Opening Hours

Daily
10am - 6pm
Till closes
5pm


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