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The River Thames

Fifty years ago the River Thames was declared biologically dead. Now it is seen as an environmental success story!

 

Water quality has improved dramatically due to legislation stopping industry from dumping pollutants into the River. Environmental groups are working to protect and create important habitats for threatened species. As a result, around 125 species of fish live in Thames waters and over 400 invertebrate species live in its muddy banks!

 

Endangered Eels migrate up the Thames every summer. Kingfishers hunt small fish and aquatic insects. Sometimes Dolphins and Porpoises travel inland from the ocean in search of fish and have sometimes been sighted in London.

 

However, there is still more that can be done! When you visit our River Thames display you will learn all about the new Thames Tideway Tunnel and how that is improving water quality further.

SEA LIFE London Aquarium often join Thames21 in cleaning up the Thames riverbanks. We annually clean up the bank beneath the London Eye.

SEA LIFE London Aquarium often join Thames21 in cleaning up the Thames riverbanks. We annually clean up the bank beneath the London Eye.

SEA LIFE London Aquarium often join Thames21 in cleaning up the Thames riverbanks. We annually clean up the bank beneath the London Eye.

Perch

Perch fish are big and chunky! They feed on worms, small fish and larvae. Their stripy body allows them to hide in small ponds, lakes, streams and rivers.

 

These creatures spawn in springtime when the female perch lays her eggs in shallow water among the shelter of plants and branches.

Our Thames display includes some beautiful wood, kindly donated by Richmond Park!

Our Thames display includes some beautiful wood, kindly donated by Richmond Park!

Our Thames display includes some beautiful wood, kindly donated by Richmond Park!