BREED,
RESCUE,
PROTECT

Turtle Rescue & Release

SEA LIFE has a long and proud track record of rescue and rehabilitation work with injured, sick and stranded sea turtles. Many of our SEA LIFE Aquariums provide long term homes for rescued turtles that cannot be returned to the wild, while others, like SEA LIFE Grapevine, in Texas (U.S.A.) specialise in the rehab and release of turtles like Flip, a juvenile, female Kemp’s Ridley Sea Turtle who was returned to the wild in 2012.

Flip became stranded in the Netherlands in December 2011, 5,000 nautical miles from her home in the Gulf of Mexico. She was taken to SEA LIFE Scheveningen in Holland to begin the long process of recovery and rehabilitation. From there, she was flown to America, and transported by the SEA LIFE Grapevine team to the Port Aransas Animal Rehabilitation Keep, where, after a glowing health assessment, she was cleared for release into the Gulf of Mexico, just under a year after she originally ran into trouble.

SEA LIFE Istanbul Aquarium is the home of the first Sea Turtle Rehabilitation Centre operated by the private sector in Turkey. Korikos, a Loggerhead Sea Turtle was found with a fractured skull and jawbone in the Mediterranean Sea, and Kilikya, a Green Sea Turtle, was rescued from the sea after being tangled in fishing line.

They received intensive rehabilitation and with the support of the SEA LIFE Trust, were satellite tagged and released back to the beach where they were found injured. The satellite tags will help track them to facilitate further data on nesting, hatching, travelling activities for research on Chelonia Mydas species.

SEA LIFE Istanbul Aquarium is the home of the first Sea Turtle Rehabilitation Centre operated by the private sector in Turkey. Korikos, a loggerhead sea turtle was found with a fractured skull and jawbone in the Mediterranean Sea, and Kilikya, a green sea turtle, was rescued from the sea after being tangled in fishing line.

 

They received intensive rehabilitation and with the support of the SEA LIFE Trust, were satellite tagged and released back to the beach where they were found injured. The satellite tags will help track them to facilitate further data on nesting, hatching, travelling activities for research on chelonia mydas species.