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Our
Creatures

Rays

There are almost 500 different species of rays and skate in our oceans and rivers. Their closest relative is the shark. Just like sharks, they don’t have a bony skeleton. Instead, their skeleton is made of cartilage (just like our nose and ears!) This makes it easier for rays to glide through the ocean. To swim they flap their fins like a bird.

 

Did you know that rays are masters of disguise? Some change colour based on the colours of the seabed. With their flat body they can hide on the ocean floor to stay protected from predators. Some use their venomous spine to protect against predators too, but only if they feel under threat.

You can make more amazing discoveries about rays on your visit to SEA LIFE! Check your local SEA LIFE site to find out about your next adventure.

FUN FACT

In ancient Greece, venom from stingray spines was used as an anaesthetic by dentists!

MEAL TIME

Australian giant rays can weigh over 300 kilograms!

BABIES

Some female rays give birth to up to six baby stingrays each year.

FUN FACT

In ancient Greece, venom from stingray spines was used as an anaesthetic by dentists!

FUN FACT

In ancient Greece, venom from stingray spines was used as an anaesthetic by dentists!

MEAL TIME

Australian giant rays can weigh over 300 kilograms!

MEAL TIME

Australian giant rays can weigh over 300 kilograms!

BABIES

Some female rays give birth to up to six baby stingrays each year.

BABIES

Some female rays give birth to up to six baby stingrays each year.