Penguins!

Our Penguin Colony are currently on a short winter adventure from the 20th November for approximately 3 months. During this time the current penguin enclosure will be undergoing renovations and screened off from the public. 

Humboldt Penguins like to nest in burrows, often using 'Guano' deposits to help build there new home. Guano is another word for penguin droppings which is a good fertiliser, often farmers try to collect the Guano which can disturb breeding.    

Though they are birds, penguins have flippers instead of wings.

They cannot fly and on land they waddle walking upright—though when snow conditions are right they will slide on their bellies.

In the water they are expert swimmers and divers, and some species can reach speeds of up to 15 miles per hour.

Humboldt penguins are thought to be declining in number, and there is thought to be as little as 10,000 left in the wild.

One of the reasons is due to El Nino increasing water temperatures and reducing food supply. They breed on the Pacific coast of South America and offshore islands of Chile and Peru.

Humboldt Penguins like to nest in burrows, often using 'Guano' deposits to help build there new home. Guano is another word for penguin droppings which is a good fertiliser, often farmers try to collect the Guano which can disturb breeding.    

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Humboldt Penguins like to nest in burrows, often using 'Guano' deposits to help build there new home. Guano is another word for penguin droppings which is a good fertiliser, often farmers try to collect the Guano which can disturb breeding.    

Show previous slide
Show next slide

Though they are birds, penguins have flippers instead of wings.

They cannot fly and on land they waddle walking upright—though when snow conditions are right they will slide on their bellies.

In the water they are expert swimmers and divers, and some species can reach speeds of up to 15 miles per hour.

Show previous slide
Show next slide

Though they are birds, penguins have flippers instead of wings.

They cannot fly and on land they waddle walking upright—though when snow conditions are right they will slide on their bellies.

In the water they are expert swimmers and divers, and some species can reach speeds of up to 15 miles per hour.

Show previous slide
Show next slide

Humboldt penguins are thought to be declining in number, and there is thought to be as little as 10,000 left in the wild.

One of the reasons is due to El Nino increasing water temperatures and reducing food supply. They breed on the Pacific coast of South America and offshore islands of Chile and Peru.

Show previous slide
Show next slide

Humboldt penguins are thought to be declining in number, and there is thought to be as little as 10,000 left in the wild.

One of the reasons is due to El Nino increasing water temperatures and reducing food supply. They breed on the Pacific coast of South America and offshore islands of Chile and Peru.

Show previous slide
Show next slide