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PENGUIN ISLAND

In Easter 2015 we launched our an amazing feature Penguin Island! Penguin Island is the first penguin walk-through experience to be introduced throughout SEA LIFE Europe and exclusive to SEA LIFE Scarborough. Come and join in the fun, as we allow our guests to get closer than ever before to our colony of Humboldt Penguins.

What to see?

 

  • Since the opening of Penguin Island we've bred seven penguin chicks, some of which were hand reared by our aquarists behind the scenes! See if you can spot Rico, Skipper, Beaker, Custard, Barnacles, Hazel and Dangermouse when you visit! 
  • We've taken note from previous designs and hired great architects to develop a state of the art penguin area. Our penguins new home now includes out crops for them to jump on and a climbing area to make sure they keep their feet in great condition.
  • Not only that, guests are able to walk directly through their home and watch them make a splash in their new babbling waterfall.
  • Guests can learn all about the important conservation issues surrounding the Humboldt Penguin in the underwater viewing cave.
  • We increased the amount of water in the new penguin area by 50% - make sure you watch out for them making a splash!
  • See how you measure up against the penguins around the world on the height chart! Are you short like a rock-hopper or larger than an emperor?

 

 

Can you spot our hand-reared penguins, Rico, Skipper, Custard, Beaker, Hazel and Barnacles?

Thanks to their loving upbringing they are the most confident members of Penguin Island.

Your most likely to see them sunbathing on the footpath of Penguin Island or coming up to guests to say hello!

Though they are birds, penguins have flippers instead of wings.

They cannot fly and on land they waddle walking upright—though when snow conditions are right they will slide on their bellies.

In the water they are expert swimmers and divers, and some species can reach speeds of up to 15 miles per hour.

Humboldt penguins are declining in number, and there is thought to be as little as 10,000 left in the wild.

One of the reasons is due to a hot water current, El Nino increasing surface water temperatures and reducing food supply. They breed on the Pacific coast of South America and offshore islands of Chile and Peru.

Can you spot our hand-reared penguins, Rico, Skipper, Custard, Beaker, Hazel and Barnacles?

Thanks to their loving upbringing they are the most confident members of Penguin Island.

Your most likely to see them sunbathing on the footpath of Penguin Island or coming up to guests to say hello!

Show previous slide
Show next slide

Can you spot our hand-reared penguins, Rico, Skipper, Custard, Beaker, Hazel and Barnacles?

Thanks to their loving upbringing they are the most confident members of Penguin Island.

Your most likely to see them sunbathing on the footpath of Penguin Island or coming up to guests to say hello!

Show previous slide
Show next slide

Though they are birds, penguins have flippers instead of wings.

They cannot fly and on land they waddle walking upright—though when snow conditions are right they will slide on their bellies.

In the water they are expert swimmers and divers, and some species can reach speeds of up to 15 miles per hour.

Show previous slide
Show next slide

Though they are birds, penguins have flippers instead of wings.

They cannot fly and on land they waddle walking upright—though when snow conditions are right they will slide on their bellies.

In the water they are expert swimmers and divers, and some species can reach speeds of up to 15 miles per hour.

Show previous slide
Show next slide

Humboldt penguins are declining in number, and there is thought to be as little as 10,000 left in the wild.

One of the reasons is due to a hot water current, El Nino increasing surface water temperatures and reducing food supply. They breed on the Pacific coast of South America and offshore islands of Chile and Peru.

Show previous slide
Show next slide

Humboldt penguins are declining in number, and there is thought to be as little as 10,000 left in the wild.

One of the reasons is due to a hot water current, El Nino increasing surface water temperatures and reducing food supply. They breed on the Pacific coast of South America and offshore islands of Chile and Peru.

Show previous slide
Show next slide

WE ARE NOW OPEN!

Covid-19 Update

We are so excited to welcome you back to our magical underwater world! Please remember it is now essential for all guests to pre-book a time slot for your visit, including for annual passes, flexi tickets and all promotional vouchers - All visits can be booked or reserved here.

To ensure the health and safety of our guests and staff, we would ask that if you are displaying any symptoms of Covid-19, or are living in an area currently subject to extended lockdown measures, you can rearrange your visit by contacting us directly at slcscarborough2@merlinentertainments.biz. To find out about the health and safety measures in place to ensure we re-open safely, please click here.
For further re-opening information, please click here.