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Humboldt penguins are thought to be declining in number, and there is thought to be as little as 10,000 left in the wild.

One of the reasons is due to El Nino increasing water temperatures and reducing food supply. They breed on the Pacific coast of South America and offshore islands of Chile and Peru.

Though they are birds, penguins have flippers instead of wings.

They cannot fly and on land they waddle walking upright—though when snow conditions are right they will slide on their bellies.

In the water they are expert swimmers and divers, and some species can reach speeds of up to 15 miles per hour.

Did you know??  When Humboldt penguins pair up they stay partners for life!

 

 

 

Humboldt penguins are thought to be declining in number, and there is thought to be as little as 10,000 left in the wild.

One of the reasons is due to El Nino increasing water temperatures and reducing food supply. They breed on the Pacific coast of South America and offshore islands of Chile and Peru.

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Humboldt penguins are thought to be declining in number, and there is thought to be as little as 10,000 left in the wild.

One of the reasons is due to El Nino increasing water temperatures and reducing food supply. They breed on the Pacific coast of South America and offshore islands of Chile and Peru.

Show previous slide
Show next slide

Though they are birds, penguins have flippers instead of wings.

They cannot fly and on land they waddle walking upright—though when snow conditions are right they will slide on their bellies.

In the water they are expert swimmers and divers, and some species can reach speeds of up to 15 miles per hour.

Show previous slide
Show next slide

Though they are birds, penguins have flippers instead of wings.

They cannot fly and on land they waddle walking upright—though when snow conditions are right they will slide on their bellies.

In the water they are expert swimmers and divers, and some species can reach speeds of up to 15 miles per hour.

Show previous slide
Show next slide

Did you know??  When Humboldt penguins pair up they stay partners for life!

 

 

 

Show previous slide
Show next slide

Did you know??  When Humboldt penguins pair up they stay partners for life!

 

 

 

Show previous slide
Show next slide

WE ARE OPEN!

COVID-19 UPDATE: Following the latest UK Government update, SEA LIFE Great Yarmouth remains OPEN as we are situated in a COVID-19 Medium Alert area. If you are travelling from a Very High Alert area please read this https://www.gov.uk/guidance/local-covid-alert-level-very-high

We encourage all guests to adhere to the latest guidance around social distancing procedures, mask/face covering and current laws on group size formations.
From the 24th September 2020 you will also find NHS QR ‘check-in’ code posters at key entry points around our attractions. These QR posters are optional and can be scanned on the NHS COVID-19 smartphone App. We encourage all our guests to help protect themselves and each other when visiting our attraction