our current campaign

protecting important habitats

The SEA LIFE Trust

Around the world, marine habitats are under threat, and not nearly enough is being done to protect them. The SEA LIFE Trust aims to change that. In 2015/2016, the Trust will be working with SEA LIFE sites across the globe to identify important local habitats, and fund projects that focus on practical action to protect those areas. For more information, visit the SEA LIFE Trust website: www.sealifetrust.org

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ABOUT THE TRUST

FACT 1

Less than 2% of our oceans are currently protected.

FACT 2

 26 million tons of plastic waste end up in the ocean each year.

FACT 3

 Coral reefs in the Indian and Pacific Oceans are vanishing faster than the rainforest.

FACT 1

Less than 2% of our oceans are currently protected.

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next

FACT 1

Less than 2% of our oceans are currently protected.

prev
next

FACT 2

 26 million tons of plastic waste end up in the ocean each year.

prev
next

FACT 2

 26 million tons of plastic waste end up in the ocean each year.

prev
next

FACT 3

 Coral reefs in the Indian and Pacific Oceans are vanishing faster than the rainforest.

prev
next

FACT 3

 Coral reefs in the Indian and Pacific Oceans are vanishing faster than the rainforest.

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next

FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN HELP

Visit The Sea Life Trust website.

 

Celebrating the largest marine protected area!

SEA LIFE Kansas City Aquarium, The SEA LIFE Trust and The Ocean Project are celebrating President Obama’s landmark decision to expand the Papahānaumokuākea Ocean off Hawaii - creating the largest protected area on the planet. 

SEA LIFE is wrapping up an extensive national awareness campaign that allowed visitors to vote for four unique ocean ecosystems - of which Papahānaumokuākea was one - to be considered for designation as a “blue park”. Thank you to all who cast their vote! 

 

Fun facts about the newest “Blue Park”!

  • Pronounced “Papa-ha-now-moh-koo-ah-kay-ah”
  • At 582,578 square miles, Papahānaumokuākea is 8 times the size of Missouri
  • Papahānaumokuākea is home to more than 7,000 species, a quarter of which are found nowhere else on Earth!
  • The shallow water environments are important habitats for rare species such as the threatened green turtle and the endangered Hawaiian monk seal, as well as 14 million seabirds.