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Coral Propagation

Over a quarter of all marine creatures call a coral reef their home!

Did you know?

Coral grows very slowly. The coral reefs in our oceans have been growing for 10,000 years! Luckily we can grow corals faster by creating the perfect conditions for them.

 

Our Coral Propagation programme helps to make up for the over-harvesting of coral from our oceans and the damage that pollution and global warming can do to the fragile Coral Reef ecosystems.

 

Recently, our Senior Aquarist, Scott Blacker headed off the the Maldives with a qualified team of Maldivian and international marine biologists working throughout the country’s resort hotels and local islands on a number for projects from island surveys to coastal and erosion management.

 

Scott and the team helped with a unique reef ranching project whose purpose is to reintroduce coral reefs into areas of decline.

 

The primary goal of the project is to help with coastal protection and marine ecology through coral propagation, using coral frames, made of welded and coated iron bars, nicknamed “coral spiders”.

 

SEA LIFE Blackpool plans to visit the new coral reef each year to see how they are getting on and to place new reefs in the ocean in the hope that one day they will form an entirely new habitat. 

 

Fun Fact!

Coral is made up of lots of very tiny creatures called ‘polyps’.

Did you know?

Coral grows very slowly. The coral reefs in our oceans have been growing for 10,000 years! Luckily we can grow corals faster by creating the perfect conditions for them.

Show previous slide
Show next slide

Did you know?

Coral grows very slowly. The coral reefs in our oceans have been growing for 10,000 years! Luckily we can grow corals faster by creating the perfect conditions for them.

Show previous slide
Show next slide

 

Our Coral Propagation programme helps to make up for the over-harvesting of coral from our oceans and the damage that pollution and global warming can do to the fragile Coral Reef ecosystems.

 

Recently, our Senior Aquarist, Scott Blacker headed off the the Maldives with a qualified team of Maldivian and international marine biologists working throughout the country’s resort hotels and local islands on a number for projects from island surveys to coastal and erosion management.

 

Scott and the team helped with a unique reef ranching project whose purpose is to reintroduce coral reefs into areas of decline.

 

The primary goal of the project is to help with coastal protection and marine ecology through coral propagation, using coral frames, made of welded and coated iron bars, nicknamed “coral spiders”.

 

SEA LIFE Blackpool plans to visit the new coral reef each year to see how they are getting on and to place new reefs in the ocean in the hope that one day they will form an entirely new habitat. 

 

Show previous slide
Show next slide

 

Our Coral Propagation programme helps to make up for the over-harvesting of coral from our oceans and the damage that pollution and global warming can do to the fragile Coral Reef ecosystems.

 

Recently, our Senior Aquarist, Scott Blacker headed off the the Maldives with a qualified team of Maldivian and international marine biologists working throughout the country’s resort hotels and local islands on a number for projects from island surveys to coastal and erosion management.

 

Scott and the team helped with a unique reef ranching project whose purpose is to reintroduce coral reefs into areas of decline.

 

The primary goal of the project is to help with coastal protection and marine ecology through coral propagation, using coral frames, made of welded and coated iron bars, nicknamed “coral spiders”.

 

SEA LIFE Blackpool plans to visit the new coral reef each year to see how they are getting on and to place new reefs in the ocean in the hope that one day they will form an entirely new habitat. 

 

Show previous slide
Show next slide

Fun Fact!

Coral is made up of lots of very tiny creatures called ‘polyps’.

Show previous slide
Show next slide

Fun Fact!

Coral is made up of lots of very tiny creatures called ‘polyps’.

Show previous slide
Show next slide

IMPORTANT INFORMATION:

Following the decision on 20th March to close SEA LIFE we continue to follow the latest Government guidelines and are asking guests with tickets booked between 26th April and 4th July 2020 to visit our website for information on how to move their booking free of charge. We are monitoring the situation in line with Government and local public health authorities and will provide an update on re-opening as soon as possible.
For more information, please click here.
If you would like to know more about the measure we have put into place to ensure the health and safety of our staff and guests, please click here.