FUN FACT

Although a Stingray’s eyes are found on the top of their head, they don’t use their eyes to find prey but can sense other creatures through electrical charges they emit

Can you guess where this creatures name comes from? It’s pretty easy; their inverted snout resembles that of the nose of a cow! Other than their cow-like faces these creatures are graceful swimmers, appearing to glide through the water as if flying.

 

The rays' eyes and spiracles are on their brown upper bodies, and their mouths are on their white or yellowish underbellies. The rays have large, flat tooth plates on both jaws that they use to crush hard-shelled prey.

 

As this ray swims through the ocean, its wingtips often break the surface, resembling the dorsal fin of a shark, which sometimes causes undue alarm for swimmers and divers. Occasionally, they jump out of the water and land with a loud smack, a behavior thought to be a territorial display.

FUN FACT

Cownose rays are known for their long migrations in large schools. They are strong swimmers, able to cover long distances.

FUN FACT

Although a Stingray’s eyes are found on the top of their head, they don’t use their eyes to find prey but can sense other creatures through electrical charges they emit

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FUN FACT

Although a Stingray’s eyes are found on the top of their head, they don’t use their eyes to find prey but can sense other creatures through electrical charges they emit

prev
next

Can you guess where this creatures name comes from? It’s pretty easy; their inverted snout resembles that of the nose of a cow! Other than their cow-like faces these creatures are graceful swimmers, appearing to glide through the water as if flying.

 

The rays' eyes and spiracles are on their brown upper bodies, and their mouths are on their white or yellowish underbellies. The rays have large, flat tooth plates on both jaws that they use to crush hard-shelled prey.

 

As this ray swims through the ocean, its wingtips often break the surface, resembling the dorsal fin of a shark, which sometimes causes undue alarm for swimmers and divers. Occasionally, they jump out of the water and land with a loud smack, a behavior thought to be a territorial display.

prev
next

Can you guess where this creatures name comes from? It’s pretty easy; their inverted snout resembles that of the nose of a cow! Other than their cow-like faces these creatures are graceful swimmers, appearing to glide through the water as if flying.

 

The rays' eyes and spiracles are on their brown upper bodies, and their mouths are on their white or yellowish underbellies. The rays have large, flat tooth plates on both jaws that they use to crush hard-shelled prey.

 

As this ray swims through the ocean, its wingtips often break the surface, resembling the dorsal fin of a shark, which sometimes causes undue alarm for swimmers and divers. Occasionally, they jump out of the water and land with a loud smack, a behavior thought to be a territorial display.

prev
next

FUN FACT

Cownose rays are known for their long migrations in large schools. They are strong swimmers, able to cover long distances.

prev
next

FUN FACT

Cownose rays are known for their long migrations in large schools. They are strong swimmers, able to cover long distances.

prev
next