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Sand Tiger Shark

Sand Tiger Sharks look ferocious with a mouth full of pointy teeth, but our divers regularly jump in with them because they aren't dangerous to humans.

  • SEA LIFE Bangkok, Sharks
Sand Tiger Shark (1)

Sand Tiger Shark

Sand Tiger Sharks look ferocious with a mouth full of pointy teeth, but our divers regularly jump in with them because they aren't dangerous to humans. They are, however, voracious predators of small fish, crustaceans and squid, feeding mostly at night and close to the ocean floor.

The Sand Tiger Shark has a very unique and curious habit. They come up to the surface of the water to gulp air and hold it in their stomachs. Sharks are naturally negatively buoyant which means they sink if they stop swimming. Holding air in their tummy like a balloon enables Sand Tigers to float motionless in the water without sinking. So they can silently drift up close to their prey and quickly snatch it in their jaws.

They can grow to be over 3 metres long and are found in warm or temperate waters throughout the world’s ocean, with the exception of the Eastern Pacific.

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Sandtiger

Sharks

Sharks have lived in our oceans for more than 420 million years! That makes them older than trees!

  • SEA LIFE Bangkok, Sharks
Ia 300000188

Sand Tiger Shark

Sand Tiger Sharks look ferocious with a mouth full of pointy teeth, but our divers regularly jump in with them because they aren't dangerous to humans.

  • SEA LIFE Bangkok, Sharks
Ia 100000000896 (1)

Nurse Shark

To spot a Nurse Shark, look for the shark with the funny moustache! These dangley bits on their top lip are actually useful things called barbels.

  • SEA LIFE Bangkok, Sharks
Black Tip Reef Shark Pxhere

Black Tip Reef Sharks

Found on the tropical coral reefs of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, Blacktip Reef Sharks prefer shallow, inshore waters.

  • SEA LIFE Bangkok, Sharks