One of the Ocean's Most Mysterious Creatures

Jellies are older than all of our ancient reptiles. Scientists believe they first swam in our oceans around 500 million years ago! There are more than 350 different species of jellies. At SEA LIFE Minnesota, you can see enchanting Moon Jellyfish and Atlantis Sea Nettles!


Jellyfish have no nerves; no blood, no heart and no brain, and their bodies consist 95% of water! A species of jellyfish, the Box Jellyfish (Sea Wasp) kills more people than any other marine creature each year!

Moon Jellyfish

  • Moon Jellies collect food in the ocean by using their tentacles
  • They can grow to be up to 16 inches in diameter!

 

Pacific Sea Nettles

  • Their color varies from transparent to bluish, pink, yellow, brown and reddish streaks!
  • Sea Nettles eat plankton, small crustaceans, fish eggs and larvae

Moon Jellyfish

  • Moon Jellies collect food in the ocean by using their tentacles
  • They can grow to be up to 16 inches in diameter!

 

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Moon Jellyfish

  • Moon Jellies collect food in the ocean by using their tentacles
  • They can grow to be up to 16 inches in diameter!

 

Show previous slide
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Pacific Sea Nettles

  • Their color varies from transparent to bluish, pink, yellow, brown and reddish streaks!
  • Sea Nettles eat plankton, small crustaceans, fish eggs and larvae
Show previous slide
Show next slide

Pacific Sea Nettles

  • Their color varies from transparent to bluish, pink, yellow, brown and reddish streaks!
  • Sea Nettles eat plankton, small crustaceans, fish eggs and larvae
Show previous slide
Show next slide